International Justice Mission

 

International Justice Mission is a human rights agency that secures justice for victims of slavery, sexual exploitation and other forms of violent oppression. IJM lawyers, investigators and aftercare professionals work with local governments to ensure victim rescue, to prosecute perpetrators and to strengthen the community and civic factors that promote functioning public justice systems.

IJM’s justice professionals work in their communities in 12 countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America to secure tangible and sustainable protection of national laws through local court systems.

IJM Collaborative Casework

IJM investigators, lawyers and social workers intervene in individual cases of abuse in partnership with state and local authorities to ensure proper support for the victim and appropriate action against the perpetrator. Such collaboration is essential to obtain convictions against individual perpetrators and to bring meaning to local laws that are meaningless if not enforced.

History

Founded in 1997, IJM began operations in response to a massive need. Historically, humanitarian and missions organizations worked faithfully and courageously to bring healthcare, education, food and other vital services to those who needed them. But little had been done to actually restrain the oppressors who are a source of great harm to the vulnerable.

Concerned by this need, a group of lawyers, human rights professionals and public officials launched an extensive study of the injustices witnessed by overseas missionaries and relief and development workers. This study, surveying more than 65 organizations and representing 40,000 overseas workers, uncovered a nearly unanimous awareness of abuses of power by police and other authorities in the communities where they served. Without the resources or expertise to confront the abuse and to bring rescue to the victims, these overseas workers required the assistance of trained public justice professionals.

Gary Haugen, working as a lawyer at the U.S. Department of Justice and as the United Nations’ Investigator in Charge in the aftermath of the Rwandan genocide, founded International Justice Mission as a response to this massive need. Today, IJM has grown to more than 300 professionals working in their own communities to fight injustice.

IJM’s Response Today

Through individual casework, IJM confronts aggressive human violence: violence that strips widows and orphans of their property and livelihoods, violence that steals dignity and health from children trafficked into forced prostitution, violence that denies freedom and security to families trapped in slavery.

Violence against the poor is not driven by the overwhelming power of the perpetrators – it is driven by the vulnerability of the victims. This violence can be stopped when the power of the law is brought to bear on behalf of those who need it, and when people of good will contribute their financial and professional resources to insisting it stop.

IJM’s casework model combats victimization and violence on the level of the individual, and supports functioning public justice systems where the poor urgently need an advocate.

Core Commitments

In the tradition of heroic Christian leaders like abolitionist William Wilberforce and transformational leaders like Mother Teresa and Martin Luther King, Jr., IJM’s staff stand against violent oppression in response to the Bible’s call to justice (Isaiah 1:17): Seek justice, rescue the oppressed, defend the orphan, plead for the widow.

IJM seeks to restore to victims of oppression the things that God intends for them: their lives, their liberty, their dignity, the fruits of their labor. By defending and protecting individual human rights, IJM seeks to engender hope and transformation for those it serves and restore a witness of courage in places of oppressive violence. IJM helps victims of oppression regardless of their religion, ethnicity, or gender.

Moving Forward

IJM has seen significant progress in its fight against oppression and injustice in the past 10 years, and remains committed to expanding its work in the next decade.

IJM continues to build networks with aftercare and other social service and government providers to ensure long-term care of clients. IJM will continue to secure prosecutions of perpetrators and contribute to positive structural change through on-the-ground involvement with the casework, courts and people of local justice systems around the world. Learn more about IJM by following our latest news from the field and get involved with the work of justice today.

 

LEARN MORE ABOUT IJM

+ VISIT IJM Website
+ MORE about Sara Groves

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Blog Calendar

BLOG

An Evening of Discussion & Next Steps | Tues Apr 27 at 7:30PM

Come discuss what you’ve heard at Art Music Justice and consider your next step — joining a small group, participating in local and global outreach, performing music or creating art. This event is free and open to all. Pizza and drinks will be served.

CALENDAR

FRIDAY APRIL 16

  • 6:30p
    Doors open for Sara Groves
  • 7:30p
    Sara Groves concert

SATURDAY APRIL 17

  • 8:00a
    Registration/Doors Open – Nicholson Hall
  • Resource Center Open – Upper Narthex
  • 9:00a
    Opening Plenary – Historic Church
  • 10:00a
    Break
  • 10:15a-11:00a
    Session I Begins
  • Charlie Peacock “The Artist as Creator, Servant, and Prophet” – Nicholson
  • Heidi Metcalf Little (Hudson Institute) “Global Philanthropy: Why Good Intentions Aren’t Enough” – Modular I
  • Christy Yates (Gordon College) “Justice Begins at Home” – Modular II
  • Elizabeth Fitch “Poetry from Pain/God’s Good Use of Our Brokenness” – Rooms 116/117
  • Ted Haddock (International Justice Mission) and Jim Wildman (National Public Radio) “Telling Stories with Words and Pictures” – Choir Room
  • Troy Groves/Shep Owen (Food for the Hungry Intl)/Jena Nardella (Blood:WaterMission) “Poverty in Africa, What You Can Do” – Southgate 106
  • Lauren Johnson (International Justice Mission) “Real Girls Beyond You.” – Southgate 112 [Cornerstone and Crossroads Girls only]
  • 11:00a-11:15a
    Break
  • 11:15a-12:00p
    Session II Begins
  • Charlie Peacock “The Artist as Creator, Servant, and Prophet” – Nicholson
  • Heidi Metcalf Little (Hudson Institute) “Global Philanthropy: Why Good Intentions Aren’t Enough” – Modular I
  • Christy Yates (Gordon College) “Justice Begins at Home” – Modular II
  • Elizabeth Fitch “Poetry from Pain/God’s Good Use of Our Brokenness” Rooms 116/117
  • Ted Haddock (International Justice Mission) and Jim Wildman (National Public Radio) “Telling Stories with Words and Pictures” – Choir Room
  • Troy Groves/Shep Owen (Food for the Hungry Intl)/Jena Nardella (Blood:WaterMission) “Poverty in Africa, What You Can Do” – Southgate 106
  • Sara Groves “The Real You” – Southgate 112 [Cornerstone and Crossroads Girls only]
  • 12:00p-1:00p
    Lunch Break
  • 1:00p-2:00p
    Plenary – Historic Church
  • 2:00p-2:15p
    Break
  • 2:15a-3:00p
    Session III Begins
  • Sara Groves “The Many Sides of a Songwriter” – Nicholson Hall
  • Rev. Bill Haley “Theology and Spirituality for AMJ: Owning Our Dignity, Anticipating Our Destiny, Releasing Our Gifts”- Modular I
  • Bill Wichterman, (Wedgwood Circle) “The Culture Stream: How Our Nation is Shaped” – Modular II
  • Andi Ashworth “The Art and Work of Caring” – Choir Room
  • Katie Keister and Connally Gilliam “The Healing Power of Art & Creativity PART I” – Southgate 104
  • Nar Tiang (The Falls Church, Outreach Department) “Who is My Neighbor? Local Justice Opportunities” – Southgate 106
  • 3:00p-3:15p
    Break
  • 3:15a-4:00p
    Session IV Begins
  • Sara Groves “The Many Sides of a Songwriter” – Nicholson Hall
  • Rev. Bill Haley “Theology and Spirituality for AMJ: Owning Our Dignity, Anticipating Our Destiny, Releasing Our Gifts”- Modular I
  • Bill Wichterman, (Wedgwood Circle) “The Culture Stream: How Our Nation is Shaped” – Modular II
  • Andi Ashworth “The Art and Work of Caring” – Choir Room
  • Katie Keister and Connally Gilliam “The Healing Power of Art & Creativity PART I” – Southgate 104
  • Nar Tiang (The Falls Church, Outreach Department) “Who is My Neighbor? Local Justice Opportunities” – Southgate 106
  • 4:00p-5:00p
    Resource Center Open
  • 6:30p
    Doors open for Jars of Clay
  • 7:30p
    Jars of Clay Concert

SUNDAY APRIL 18

  • 11a
    Sunday Service – Worship Service, to include special music & messages from Sara Groves and more
  • 1p
    Lunch with Local Ministry Partners and Shep Owen – Director, Kenya for Food for the Hungry (Location: Fellowship Hall)